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Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
sciencenow" here on pbs. that is coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: joan walsh is an editor at large for salon and the author of a new book, "what's the matter w/white people?: why we long for a golden age that never was." she joins us tonight from new york. >> thank you, tavis. good to be back. tavis: this title is provocative. "what's the matter with white people?" >> the title has three meanings, but we get stuck on one, thanks to mitt romney and paul ryan. why does it happen that 90% of identified republicans according to the gallup poll are white in a country that is now 62% non- hispanic white? looking at this house some moved away towards the democratic p
, a provider of multimediwspa ne dul tidia news and information services worldwide. be more, pbs. tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. tonight, a conversation with actor turned travel writer andrew mccarthy. the former star is out with a book detailing his travels around the globe the text is called "the longest way home." in his role at editor at large for national geographic traveler, we are glad you have joined us. >> there is a saying that dr. king had said, there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only about halfway to completely eliminate hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: please welcome andrew mccarthy to this program. he is now an award winning travel writer that serves as an editor at large for national geographic travel. the his critically acclaimed book is called "along the way home.
. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: please welcome andrew mccarthy to this program. he is now an award winning travel writer that serves as an editor at large for national geographic travel. the his critically acclaimed book is called "along the way home." nice to have you on this program. i assume that you must be tackled at the reception this book is receiving. >> it is also a huge relief because it is a complicated thing. it is a relief when it is received in a nice way so that it can stand and rise and fall on its own as opposed to some weird baggage it gets from being my history. tavis: yeah, yeah. were their doubts or trepidation about putting a buck out where travel is that the epicenter of that? and it is about your life. any fear about being so transparent? gosh no, that is the short answer. the book turned out more personal than i thought it would be when i began, but i did not want to write a travel book perce. travel was the form i have been writing about for the last 10 years, a platform that i understood. i use travel to seoul dilemmas
. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. ank you. tavis: please welcome t.i. back to this program out with a later cd -- with a cd later this year. he has also just released a new book. of or get to that, here is video for go get it. ♪ ♪ tavis: and now a book. you stay busy, man. how have you been? >> i have been blessed. tavis: david work on you with this project, he is a wonderful collaborator. he did more than gays a book, and ray charles, aretha franklin, b became. he has talked all the greats but this is a little different because this is a novel. >> the first fictional novel. our paths crossed because he had intentions or aspirations for doing my biography. and i had to wrap my mind around the idea of being a 29-year-old with a biography. tavis: no memoirs at 29. >> he said, i always wanted to do fiction. with his began brainstorming immediately. he said he wanted to do if in the world that i know. we just collectively created this world and these characters in this plot. we have been off to the races ever since. you know what? a thing of a little biased.
. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: sheila bair is the former chair of the fdic. her efforts to take on wall street excess and stand up for average americans is the subject of the new text "bull by the horns." to goodve you on this program. >> thank you for having me. tavis: let me start with the news of this week. everybody knows in 48 hours, for the first time, mitt romney and mr. obama will come face to face in a debate. if you were jim wednesday night, where these issues are concerned, at the economy, how we avoid what has happened already, how we avoid falling into another recession, around those issues, what ought to be debated wednesday night? >> they should be challenged about whether we want a sustainable financial system. will both presidents appoint people to their economic team who will see the economic interest of the people probably? -- broadly? will they appoint regulators who will be independent of wall street? will they support them when they need to make decisions? will this president protect regulators when congress tries to beat up
. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: ari berman is a political correspondent for "the nation" and author of the book "herding donkeys." last year he wrote a piece called "the gop war on voting." much of what he wrote has come to fruition. he joins us from new york. good to have you on this program. >> i am a longtime admirer. thanks for having me. tavis: honored to have you on. let me talk about this piece you wrote for "rolling stone." i don't want people to think we are demonizing or casting aspersions on the gop, but i want you to lay out the facts. is it the case that most of this push, these strict voter i.d. laws, this is being pushed almost exclusively by republicans, yes or no? >> there are issues where democrats and republicans are at fault, where they are both to blame. this is not one of these issues. this is an issue that since the 2010 elections, laws that restrict the right to vote have been passed overwhelmingly by republicans in states with republican legislatures and republican government. that includes efforts to crack down on v
pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: please welcome jeffrey sachs back to this program. he is one of the most important voices in our time. the director of the earth institute at columbia. his latest book is called "the price of civilization." he joins us tonight from new york. jeffrey sachs, good to have you back on this program. >> good to be back on. tavis: what has happened in this country since you wrote this book that made to put some new stuff in it for the paperback version? >> this book was about things really going wrong in america. the lack of civic virtue among the rich and powerful that we have expected and that we need. after i put the pen down in a writing the original book, the occupy movement brought attention finally around this country to huge inequalities. we have a campaign between a republican party that has a double down on greed and fear -- for the super-rich versus president obama of who is trying to steer a middle course. i like to see him steer a little bit more, frankly, even progressive to the progressive side, but compared to where romney i
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)